Are you new to the minerals and stones world? You are in for a treat. Today, I am presenting 10 of the most beautiful stones and minerals you will ever see on the internet! Many people know minerals and stones as opals, diamonds, sapphires and various gemstones. There are, however, a plentiful amount of stones, minerals and crystals that is forgotten. In my opinion, the following list of these beautiful stones and minerals tops any diamond I will ever see

Black Opal

black opal

Yes, I know what you’re thinking. “Black opal? I thought it was just opal?” No, there are several different types of opal. The most common opal is either Oregon or Australian white opal. This particular opal has a darker body tone which allows the iridescent colours to shine through and appear a lot brighter. As beautiful as white opal is, when comparing the two stones together, it’s obvious that black opal is much more breath-taking. Black opal is found most frequently throughout Australia.

Fluorite

Fluorite

One of my personal favourite crystals. Fluorite displays an array of blues and purples. Literally speaking, fluorite is “a mineral consisting of calcium fluoride that typically occurs as cubic crystals, colourless when pure but often coloured by impurities.” Although the blues and purples are impurities in the stone, it is what causes the beauty in this unique mineral. In the picture displayed to the left, you can view the colour fluctuations in fluorite.The most common countries to find fluorite is Argentina and Austria. If you want to find Chlorophane Fluorite, which is fluorite that produces a green thermoluminescence you can take an adventure to Franklin, New Jersey, the Bluebird Mine in Arizona or Gilgit, Pakistan.

Bismuth

bismuth

This is an extremely unique mineral. It almost looks as if it belongs in either our phone or computer. Although it’s not a commonly known mineral, some companies have began to use this mineral as a replacement for lead in hunters ammunition. The largest deposits of Bismuth can be found in Bolivia.

Chrysocolla

Chrysocolla

Literally speaking, chrysocolla is “a greenish-blue mineral consisting of hydrated copper silicate, typically occurring as opaline crusts and masses.” Finding the right picture for this mineral was difficult because of how beautiful it is! I mean look at it – beautiful hues of blue swirled around with whites. It’s so elegant and massive, how amazing is this mineral? It’s one of the few copper bearing minerals in this world right next to azurite and turquoise (just to name a couple). In fact, many people confuse this mineral with the two that I listed but I can assure you they are all different and beautiful in their own way. Common places to find chrysocolla is Arizona, Russia and Chile.

Azurite

Azurite

Another stunning copper-bearing mineral (just as it’s friend chrysocolla above). I’m not sure how this deep blue mineral can be confused with the lighter blue mineral, Chrysocolla. The colour contrasts from the two is breathtaking and unbelievable. I know Mother Nature can create miracles and true beauty but who know it could be so colourful? If you are ever on a hunt for Azurite take a trip to Arizona, New Mexico or Utah. There are plenty of mines you can explore to find copper deposits which produce this beautiful mineral.

Watermelon Tourmaline

Watermelon Tourmaline

I’ll give you one guess as to why this stone has been nicknamed “Watermelon tourmaline”. Did you guess because it looks like a watermelon? Well, you were right! This natural occurring mineral is either green in the center and surrounded with red or the reverse (as shown in the photo). Another amazing fact about this stone is that different cuts and different views can provide multiple colors and hues to be exposed. Watermelon tourmaline can be found in the state of Maine or in Brazil.

Uvarovite

Uvarovite

Watch-out Emerald, there’s a new green mineral that everyone should learn about, you’re hogging the spotlight!There’s more than one green stone out there my friends, now presenting a product of calcium aluminium silicate and calcium iron silicate, Uvarovite! This dark and bright green stone was discovered in 1832 (only two years after Emerald) but it doesn’t get nearly as much recognition. It definitely deserves some attention so go on an adventure to the Ural Mountains in Russia and hunt for some.

Crocoite

Crocoite

This bright orange mineral strongly resembles a haystack or a stack of baby carrots. It’s orange beauty is not like anything I’ve seen before and the forming of crystals is unbelievable. It looks as if someone cut the mineral into shards and began to stack one on top of the other. Are you wondering what causes this beautiful shade of orange? It’s not copper, in fact, crocoite is composed of lead chromate. This is a rare stone and currently has only been found in the United States in various mines in both Arizona and California.

Boulder Opal

Boulder Opal

I know, another opal added to the list. What can I say? Opal is a beautiful stone that I simply can’t resist. This opal is quite amazing though. It’s almost like a fossilised (or petrified wood). You can see traces of iridescent minerals in petrified wood and it’s quite beautiful. Boulder opal is like a fossilised rock, except the traces of minerals is opal instead! It’s not just white opal either, as you can see in the picture below, blue will make an appearance as well. A beautiful boulder with slivers, swirls and sometimes even more Opal bonded to the either ironstone or sandstone boulders. The only known location to find boulder opal is Queensland, Australia.

Labradorite

Labradorite

One of the most unusual minerals known to man, this tone can display beautiful iridescent colours similar to opal but a little more complex. The colours are displayed due to the internal fractures that reflect light back and forth onto itself which causes an array of colours. The composition of labradorite is sodium calcium aluminium silicate. If you ever want to check this tone out in person, venture to Finland, Madagascar or Ukraine.

Conclusion

There are still hundreds, even thousands more of other beautiful crystals and minerals on this planet we call home. Minerals are actually living stones and I’m sure there are new minerals that are being produced that haven’t been discovered yet. The ten stones I listed are the minerals I found to be most beautiful and unique. However, all stones are unique in it’s own way and different cuts of the the same stone can display more beauty than others.